INTJ careers

This article will focus on typical INTJ careers, skills that people with this personality type bring into the workplace, and their relationships with colleagues and managers. Please feel free to leave your comments or suggest other career paths below – we will do our best to incorporate your suggestions.

INTJ personalities are known for their ability to digest difficult and complex theories and principles relevant to their careers and then convert them into clear and actionable ideas. INTJs are excellent strategists, possessing intuition and confidence that allow them to devise and implement challenging, long-term plans without many problems. These skills can be tremendously valuable in the right career path. People with this personality type are great at jobs that involve planning, strategy, and application of complex theoretical principles. For instance, you could find many INTJs among project managers, system engineers, or marketing strategists. These are often their best career choices.

Typical INTJ careers also tend to put a lot of importance on independent thinking. INTJs love difficult challenges and strongly detest routine, doing whatever they can to avoid or automate mind-numbing tasks. It is difficult to imagine an INTJ willingly choosing a strictly administrative or teamwork-focused role. They excel as “lone wolves” and the best INTJ careers revolve around this trait, giving INTJs enough breathing space to use their creativeness and dedication without being constantly questioned by other team members.

People with this personality type put effectiveness and competence above everything else. Consequently, the best INTJ careers reward personal initiative and determination. INTJs believe that everyone should do their best to complete the task to the highest possible standard and loathe individuals who use social activities and networking rather than merit to get ahead on the career ladder. There is no easier way to lose the respect of an INTJ than to show that you believe social skills and relationships are more important than professional competence. INTJs have very high standards, especially when it comes to their own work, and are likely to put in an extraordinary amount of effort to get the job done. Consequently, typical INTJ careers reward inventiveness, dedication, and insightfulness.

INTJs tend to have excellent analytical and creative skills. They are highly unlikely to choose or enjoy customer-facing or teamwork-oriented careers; these are definitely not the best choices for INTJs. As already mentioned, INTJs are brilliant strategists and planners, but they do best alone or in small teams. People with this personality type will gladly accept someone else’s authority and leadership, as long as they see that individual as competent. These traits make INTJs excellent engineers, military strategists, programmers, system analysts, lawyers, or freelance consultants. These are typical INTJ career paths, and their performance in these areas is often very impressive.

If you would like to learn more about the INTJ career paths and professional development, as well as read about the experiences of other INTJs, download the INTJ In-Depth Profile – a 70+ page guide covering a number of diverse topics. Otherwise, please keep reading:






49 Responses to “INTJ careers”

  1. INT/FJ Reply

    I took this test today and got INFJ, whereas I almost always get INTJ (and occasionally when I’m feeling very social I get ENTJ). I’ve taught elementary school, worked in recruiting, HR, and will soon be starting a Ph.D. program in Social Psychology – I think it’ll provide the right balance between leadership (teaching), creative thought (coming up with studies), and analysis (working with data), whereas none of the positions yet have done as much for me. Also, I get to make a career out of studying people, yay!
    It’s interesting to see where people bounce back and forth in terms of personality categorization. I consider why I pulled INFJ today instead of INTJ, and I think it’s a result of the place you I am in in life. I’m in a job now that has such strong barriers against learning and making system improvements, and I’ve found little competence or willingness from others around me when I’ve tried to change this. I think that as a result, I’ve strayed from my usual “Thinking” mindset in pursuit of a more “Feeling” mindset to deal with the challenges of the workplace, and focus on changing my career path. However, in situations where I’ve felt more in control, more able to make change and exercise my strengths, I always move back toward the “Thinking” direction. Interesting food for thought… I wonder how it will continue to change over time.

  2. Simon Tailor Reply

    As far as the menial jobs/ tasks or working in groups go, I always see it as a chance to test the limits/knowledge of others. I have been known to play this game for months with coworkers using their own knowledge about topics against them. The job itself I automate, the social aspect is the game. So long as the job pays for my needs the rest is fun.