Architect Personality

INTJ-A / INTJ-T

Career Paths

“The role of genius is not to complicate the simple, but to simplify the complicated.”

Criss Jami

Professional know-how is often where Architects shine most brilliantly. They easily take in complex principles and techniques and change them into clear and actionable strategies. No other personality type comes close to their ability to assess and organize concepts.

Architects can usually sort out the “noise” of a situation. They then find the core thread that needs to be pulled to unravel messes – which they then put back together again. In the process, they produce the most elegant solutions to problems. As they grow, their confidence, enthusiasm, and creativity typically lead them to more interesting work. In time, they are likely to earn the independence they typically desire.

Architect (INTJ) careers

The real problem for Architects is that they need their new and creative ideas to be heard. They need to have someone in charge listen to them. Forming relationships with people who make decisions is not exactly part of the Architects’ core strengths. In their early careers, Architects often have to do boring tasks that don’t challenge them and deal with having their ideas repeatedly rejected. But, with time, they are likely to develop their abilities into skill sets so effective that they get noticed.

Working Best, Working Alone

People with the Architect personality type prefer to work alone, or in small groups. There, they make the most of their creativity and focus without constant interruptions from curious coworkers and supervisors who call too many meetings. Architects are unlikely to be found in management roles or anything that involves nonstop interaction and teamwork. Rather, Architects prefer more “lone wolf” jobs. They like a drawing board more than a boardroom meeting. They only get along with leaders who understand their style of working and can help advance their visions.

Architects dislike anyone who gets ahead by playing the office politics game well or working a company’s social scene just right. They judge their coworkers by what they can do and not who they know. Architects have high standards. If they view a colleague or supervisor as being not up to those standards or otherwise ineffective, respect will be instantly and permanently lost.

People with the Architect personality type value personal resourcefulness, grit, insight, and commitment in themselves and in others. They believe that everyone should complete their work and meet the highest possible standards. If a social butterfly at work breezes through without carrying their own weight, they may find Architects using their ingenuity to find ways to stop their nonsense.

Earning the Right Positions

As their careers progress further and their reputations grow, so will the challenges of the tasks and projects Architects are offered. Architect personalities demand progress and evolution, and they love to explore new ideas. They often satisfy this by pushing themselves into more active strategic positions. While they don’t care for the spotlight, Architects do enjoy controlling their ideas. They often take on low-profile but influential roles as project managers, systems engineers, marketing strategists, systems analysts, and military strategists.

Architects view a combination of intelligent approach and hard work as the road to excellence.

But really, Architects’ vision, creativity, and skill in carrying out their plans make these personalities possible candidates for just about any career. Some careers, such as low-level sales and human resources, clearly don’t play to their strengths, but that shouldn’t stop them if they decide to take up these kinds of work. Architects have the qualities necessary to work in just about any organization if they decide to. And if they find nothing out in the world, they usually have in abundance what it takes to start their own businesses.

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