ENFP Parents

If there is anything that makes ENFPs great parents, it’s the sense of wonder they have for all things new and beautiful, a sense that they will be able to share with their children every day as they learn and grow. Throughout their children’s lives, ENFPs provide a combination of almost overwhelming love and support, and an unstructured environment revolving around freedom and creativity. This in no way means that people with the ENFP personality type will simply leave their children to their own devices without guidance – rather, ENFP parents want to share in their children’s perspective, share in a world without bounds.

ENFP parents are playful and warm, and love to see their children excited, playing in and experimenting with the world around them. It is likely that ENFP parents will encourage this play and growth by suggesting activities and lessons.

ENFP parents
ENFPs will embrace and encourage productive interests as they arise, sweeping away dolls and dinosaurs when interests shift to the oceans, and sweeping away the fish when tastes change again, to the stars.

While they often enough recognize the value of structure and predictability, ENFP parents are unlikely to have the heart (or as they may see it, the lack of heart) to establish these limitations themselves. They may need to depend on their partners to provide some necessary guidelines and discipline from time to time, but ENFP parents will always have the advantage of their open-minded and empathetic nature, making them not just parents, but friends who their children feel comfortable confiding in. They needn’t always depend on their children broaching the subject either, as ENFPs have a natural skill in spotting emotional disharmony or physical discomfort in others.

Go On, Spread Your Wings

As their children approach the teenage years, all this emotion and attention can start to cloy, and their children may seek a more private independence. This can be a challenge for people with the ENFP personality type – they have strong emotions, and invest those emotions heavily in the things and people they care about. While they may not be big on using proven ideas, ENFPs do like to see whether or not their ideas work, and this applies to their thoughts on parenting, too. As their adolescent children withdraw, they leave an unsolved mystery that can last for years, leaving their ENFP parents wondering if their ideas on raising their children actually work, actually result in happy, independent and creative adults.

Luckily for them, so long as they raise their children with a sense of productive independence, rather than an aimless, against-the-grain antipathy, ENFPs will find that their children have developed a strong sense of self and self-worth, going confidently out into the big, wide world at their own pace and in their own style, knowing that they have both themselves and their ENFP parents to depend on.

Anonymous
1 year ago
This is so accurate
Jambow
1 year ago
Only those crazy enough think they can change the world.
Cara
1 year ago
And only the craziest of us actually do. ;)
Kendrix
1 year ago
The best thing about having an ENFP mom is that rather than having a preset idea about what their children ought to become, she is very interested in getting to know us as individuals and happy that we're so diverse, though sometimes she wishes the introverts among us would come out of our rooms more. They have smetimes be called "the most encouraging personality type" She also definitely learns from her mistakes and avoids them with the younger children, and I always had a real sense that she wants to share what she learned from her experiences with us, and that it's important to her to understand us and that we know we can trust her and open up to her. Also, she's simply fun to be with. I can recognize here that it's a bit hard on her that we are reaching the stage where we move out and gets jobs, she kind of wants to have grandchildren before her house gets empty So basically, good thing society has people like mom.
1 year ago
so true
Someone in Colorado
1 year ago
This is the kind of parent I want to be !
Senior in High School
1 year ago
My mother is an ENFP and this is not how I feel as a child at all. She does support things that I do, but if I don't do them the way she wants she sames me so I have hardly any self confidence. I don't feel like I can ever stick up for myself because she does it for me, so I don't know how to defend myself. A lot of this stuff is correct about her though. She does have a hard time letting go of me as I age, and in her mind I think it's because she's curious to see if I flourish as an adult, but she more does it out of her selfishness rather than actually caring about my well-being. Everything revolves around her and she is selfish about everything. If something doesn't benefit her, she doesn't want to participate in it, including raking me to rehearsals or practices. She wants me to join all those things to help me grow, but how am I supposed to get to them if she doesn't drive me? It's frustrating to be a child of an ENFP mother, especially when my parents aren't married and we live with my mother's mother, who has the complete opposite personality (ISTJ) so I'm constantly in the middle of arguments. I wish my mother had any other personality type than this one, and I can't wait to turn 18 so I can cut her awful attitude and personality out of my life.
Kendrix
1 year ago
This article here describes a well-developed, non-pathological individual, tho. First, I'd consider if she's really a P if she's so bossy and imposing. Your mom sounds like she's a very least immature. If you're not overstating her selfishness, she might have a narcicisstic parenting style or full blown narcissistic disorder, and that sort of huge pathology usually overrides the interpersonal virtues a person would have if they were a fully mature adult. My father is just the same: Normally an ISTJ (hard worker, likes order and clear tasks, conservative, ascetic, rigid, wants to serve the public etc.) would be big on integrity and devotion, but since he's got the emotional maturity of a toddler he just treats us all as extensions of himself, bullies us and flies of the handle everytime someone disagrees with him. He's a great employee but when he's interacting with his family, he has only the bad sides and then some. Moving out will be very good for you and you should do it ASAP for the sake of your mental health, but don't assume that your mom's meanness is typical for all ENFPs.
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