ISFJ Careers

In many ways, ISFJs are the backbone of the modern workforce. Altruistic and well-rounded, no other personality type is so well-suited to be of service of others. It is no surprise that many ISFJs are not just good at supporting their coworkers and customers in human resources and support positions, they genuinely enjoy it, as it gives them the chance to calm frustrations, see things through to a practical solution, and to be thanked, appreciated, at the close of each ordeal.

Be Humble and Earnest

ISFJs are skilled at remembering things about others which makes them not only valuable assistants, but well-liked colleagues. People with the ISFJ personality type can always be counted on to remember a birthday, a graduation, or simply a frequent customers’ name, and that can make all the difference. Add to these amiable qualities ISFJs’ meticulousness, hard work and dedication, and it’s no surprise that their careers often progress smoothly, with few of the ups and downs that accompany more high-flying types.

ISFJ careers

However, ISFJs are unlikely to actively seek out managerial positions, and are still more unlikely to brag about their accomplishments. ISFJ personalities prefer to be rewarded by seeing first-hand the positive impact of their efforts, and will remain enthusiastic simply knowing that what they do is genuinely appreciated by the people they care for. This makes them natural counselors, technical support, and interior designers, where they are able to help others one-on-one without having to worry about corporate politics.

Whether they seek promotion or not it happens often enough, as ISFJs’ ability to implement ideas and “create order from chaos” is bound to make an impression.

Respecting tradition and security, ISFJs have no problem with the idea of moving along in a structured hierarchy, and while they may not always seek out these managerial positions, they fill them well. ISFJs are well-tuned to others’ emotions and have a strong sense of practicality, extending their own ability to get things done to their teams.

Where ISFJs struggle is in generating new ideas and in grasping abstract concepts – fields like academic research and corporate strategy are too intangible and too impersonal to utilize ISFJs’ strengths. Similar challenges arise in more typical careers when changes are forced through by ISFJs’ employers – advance warning and a proper explanation can help to smooth the shock, but if the changes cut back on things like the quality of customer service, it can feel like a betrayal in the face of their loyalty and dedication.

Live Pleasantly and Do Good

Strong, well-developed institutions alongside like-minded friends are attractive workplaces for people with the ISFJ personality type, and careers as nurses, elementary school teachers and social and religious workers are attractive options. Sometimes the desire to help others is enough in itself – it’s not uncommon to find ISFJs volunteering and helping the community at shelters, food banks and their children’s schools. ISFJs are warm, service-oriented people, and hardly anyone is more welcome in these (and many, many other) roles.

Stephanie
3 years ago
I'm an ISFJ who has been working in the clerical field now for about 6 months and I FINALLY feel like a found a job where I 'fit.' Retail was horrendous, sales was unbearable.....in this career path, I can have my nice, organized workspace, have enough communication with people to get my job done, but nothing above and beyond, and I get to "create order from chaos."
JohnJRenns
3 years ago
Wouldn't an ISFJ be a good lawyer as well? Because you know, lawyers need to remember a ton of things, and even though many people disagree, their point is to literally 'defend' people?
Anonymous
3 years ago
I do not think so, only because isfj's tend to dislike and avoid conflict. Being a lawyer of almost any type is sure to involve tons of conflict with others.
Sara
3 years ago
If you are a criminal attorney then yes it involves conflict as well as family law like child cases etc. but there are lawyers that do closings for properties and help people change their wills or trusts etc so not everything a lawyer does involves conflict. You can teach law too if you want that would be less conflict also but really most jobs out there have a lot of conflict just DO WHAT YOU LIKE.
Melissa
3 years ago
We'll , I'm a choreographer , go figure, Then a dancer before that. There is nothing I like better than to create something from nothing and to work with a small group of dancers and designers
B
3 years ago
I'm an ISFJ and the only career path that hasn't stressed me out but keeps me less stressed is graphic designing
Bob P.
3 years ago
I'm an ISFJ and I found my niche in IT tech support. I've worked in a few different support jobs, each one a little different. But they all offered me the opportunity to use my people skills and ISFJ traits to help people resolve confusing and frustrating computer issues. As most of my contacts are successful, the vast majority of them end with the customer expressing their gratitude. This is especially true of the phone calls, more so than the e-mails. On the phone, I am able to use my calming personality to help the person get past their frustration so we can work together to resolve their issue. I love what I do and I'm good at it.
Your name: